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Human-Collective Teams: Algorithms, Transparency & Resilience

Human-Collective Teams: Algorithms, Transparency & Resilience

Biological inspiration for artificial systems abounds. The science to support robotic collectives continues to emerge based on their biological inspirations, spatial swarms (e.g., fish and starlings) and colonies (e.g., honeybees and ants). Developing effective human-collective teams requires focusing on all aspects of the integrated system development. This presentation will focus on three aspects: algorithms, transparency and resilience for collectives. Very large numbers of simplistic individuals use biologically inspired algorithms to solve more complex problems.

Using Technology for Health, Well-being and Empathy

Using Technology for Health, Well-being and Empathy

How can we create technologies to help us reflect on and change our behavior (if needed) and improve our health and overall well-being both at work and at home? In this talk, I will briefly describe the last several years of work our research team has been doing in this area. We have developed wearable technology to help families manage tense situations with their children, mobile phone-based applications for handling stress and depression, as well as automatic sensing systems for tracking well-being over time.

Joint Human-Autonomy Modeling, Design, & Testing

Joint Human-Autonomy Modeling, Design, & Testing

Professor Cummings will talk about current projects underway in the Duke Humans and Autonomy Laboratory that focus on the development of joint human-autonomous system models, designs of systems to promote safe and effective interaction, and then how testing can be accomplished to determine areas of vulnerabilities and possible mitigations.

Technology, Mind, & Behavior: An Open-Access Home for Cutting-Edge Work on Human Robotics Interactions

Technology, Mind, & Behavior: An Open-Access Home for Cutting-Edge Work on Human Robotics Interactions

Technologies are currently the centerpiece to communication, socializing, health care, business, social well-being, and national security.  Technology's current ubiquity renders the new APA journal, Technology, Mind, and Behavior (TMB) even more relevant to human life. TMB provides a home for researchers who wish to elucidate human–technology interaction and share their research on an open forum, accessible to all.